Powerful heads coifed in powdered wigs.

 

Enrobed men & women.  Draped in black gowns sweeping almost to their shoes are the barristers, the lawyers, the judges.

 

Bigwigs with their big wigs, once powdered, perched on their heads.

 

The legal brief, the papers, carried in their brief case or under their arm.

 

A caricature of course.

 

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In reality, the elements of professional conduct, moral & ethical, long exacted of lawyers was perhaps best described by MR. JUSTICE FRANKFURTER (MR. JUSTICE CLARK & MR. JUSTICE HARLAN join, concurring) in Schware v Board of Law Examiners 353 US 232 (1957)

 

Certainly since the time of Edward I, through all the vicissitudes of seven centuries of Anglo-American history, the legal profession has played a role all its own. The bar has not enjoyed prerogatives; it has been entrusted with anxious responsibilities. One does not have to inhale the self-adulatory bombast of after-dinner speeches to affirm that all the interests of man that are comprised under the constitutional guarantees given to “life, liberty and property” are in the professional keeping of lawyers. It is a fair characterization of the lawyer’s responsibility in our society that he stands “as a shield,” to quote Devlin, J., in defense of right and to ward off wrong. From a profession charged with such responsibilities there must be exacted those qualities of truth-speaking, of a high sense of honor, of granite discretion, of the strictest observance of fiduciary responsibility, that have, throughout the centuries, been compendiously described as “moral character.”

British Judge Lord/Baron Patrick Devlin
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Images via  PHOTOFILIA: PAOLO ROVERSI
vv   VOGUE ITALIA, Powerful Heads, MARCH 2005